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Prisoner uprising stopped in Brackettville

A prisoner uprising at a private-prison in Brackettville was stopped with no serious incidents, reports the San Antonio Express-News.

Officials at the Kinney County Detention Center, which is operated by for-profit prison company Community Education Centers (CEC), said that the uprising was quelled without any serious incident, although officials from U.S. Marshals, Border Patrol, and Kinney County Sheriff were called in. CEC operates the prison for the U.S. Marshals, who detain about 400 prisoners at the facility.

A spokesperson from CEC said that about 60 prisoners refused to leave the recreation area and return to their cells, protesting the earlier removal of another prisoner. The warden locked down the unit & then used force and tear gas to disperse the prisoners. According to the Kinney County sheriff, no one was hurt on either side.

This is not the first uprising that has happened in the Kinney County prison. In 2008, another riot required the facility to be put on lockdown. Over the years, CEC has also been subject to multiple lawsuits, including over the deaths of prisoners in their custody.

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CCA official says Eden Prison Protest Has Ended

A CCA spokesperson said that the standoff between inmates and prison guards has been resolved, reports San Angelo Live!.  

As reported earlier, a protest at the Eden Detention Center started late in the evening of July 29th. A caller to San Angelo Live!, who identified herself only as a sister of an inmate, revealed that her brother said "that the inmates are being treated inhumanely." She went on to state that he said "they wanted to be treated with dignity and like human beings."

CCA spokesperson Steven Owen did not reveal if any of the grievances of the inmates were addressed to resolve the protest that was characterized as "passive."

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Officials Confirm Prisoner Protest at Eden Detention Center

A report of a protest at Eden Detention Center has been confirmed by Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) officials, reports San Angelo Live!

 

A CCA spokesperson said in a statement, "A group of inmates at the Eden Detention Center is refusing to leave the recreation yard and return to their housing units." This statement confirms previous reports San Angelo Live! received from various outlets, including a woman who called to say she is a sister of an inmate in the Eden Correctional Facility. She said that her brother told her that "pretty much the whole facility was protesting."

 

Personnel were seen entering the facility in full riot gear that evening around 10:10 p.m. An ambulance was also seen leaving Eden at approximately the same time. We will share

developments as they are released.

 

The Eden prison is one of the federal government’s segregated prisons for immigrants, or “Criminal Alien Requirement” (CAR) facilities. We’ve covered it since 2010, when a prisoner uprising caused a lockdown there.

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Immigrant prisoner uprising at Willacy County CAR prison

Last week, up to 2,000 immigrant prisoners staged a two-day riot at a private prison in Raymondville, TX. According to a report by DemocracyNow!, the prisoners were protesting inadequate medical care when they refused to eat breakfast on February 20, seized control of part of the prison, and set fires.

The prison, Willacy County Correctional Center, is owned and operated by the private prison company Management & Training Corporation (MTC), and is known by critics as "Ritmo" — short for Raymondville’s Guantánamo prison. It is also referred to as “tent city” because the majority of the prisoners sleep in large, cramped kevlar tents.

Willacy County Correctional Center

The Raymondville prison is also one of 13 privately operated CAR or “Criminal Alien Requirement” prisons. Carl Takei, staff attorney with the ACLU’s national prison project explained:

"Willacy is one of 13 private prisons in the federal system. It’s sort of a shadow system within the Federal Bureau of Prisons system, that is run by private prison companies. These prisons house immigrants who have been convicted of drug offenses and immigrants who have been convicted of something called illegally re-entering the United States after deportation. The Bureau of Prisons has consigned immigrants to these prisons based on the assumption that they are all going to be deported after their sentences are up. And it can therefore treat them as second-class prisoners and hand them over to these for-profit companies that have a history of abusing and mistreating the people in their custody."

Takei also authored the report, Warehoused and Forgotten: Immigrants Trapped in Our Shadow Private Prison System, which provides a closer look at CAR prisons and the inhumane conditions inside.  

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