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CCA official says Eden Prison Protest Has Ended

A CCA spokesperson said that the standoff between inmates and prison guards has been resolved, reports San Angelo Live!.  

As reported earlier, a protest at the Eden Detention Center started late in the evening of July 29th. A caller to San Angelo Live!, who identified herself only as a sister of an inmate, revealed that her brother said "that the inmates are being treated inhumanely." She went on to state that he said "they wanted to be treated with dignity and like human beings."

CCA spokesperson Steven Owen did not reveal if any of the grievances of the inmates were addressed to resolve the protest that was characterized as "passive."

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Officials Confirm Prisoner Protest at Eden Detention Center

A report of a protest at Eden Detention Center has been confirmed by Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) officials, reports San Angelo Live!

 

A CCA spokesperson said in a statement, "A group of inmates at the Eden Detention Center is refusing to leave the recreation yard and return to their housing units." This statement confirms previous reports San Angelo Live! received from various outlets, including a woman who called to say she is a sister of an inmate in the Eden Correctional Facility. She said that her brother told her that "pretty much the whole facility was protesting."

 

Personnel were seen entering the facility in full riot gear that evening around 10:10 p.m. An ambulance was also seen leaving Eden at approximately the same time. We will share

developments as they are released.

 

The Eden prison is one of the federal government’s segregated prisons for immigrants, or “Criminal Alien Requirement” (CAR) facilities. We’ve covered it since 2010, when a prisoner uprising caused a lockdown there.

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600 people protest the CCA family detention camp in Dilley, Texas

Dilley Camp Protest
Dilley Camp Protest
Over 600 protesters called for the end of the incarceration of immigrant women and children in Dilley, Texas on May 2, shutting down a highway along the way.

Organized by Grassroots Leadership and Texans United for Families, the protest brought people from Austin, San Antonio, Houston, the Rio Grande Valley, Laredo, Dallas, Falfurrias, San Marcos, and Elgin, Texas; as well as from Silver City and Santa Fe NM, Des Moines IA, Washington D.C., New York City, the Bay Area, Los Angeles, and Orange County, California. Protesters began in a park in central Dilley and marched almost 2 miles to the family detention camp.

During the march, they forced the closure of Texas Highway 85. Once outside the gates of the camp, the protesters heard from people who had been detained, including a woman who was held in a Japanese incarceration camp during WWII.

The South Texas Family Residential Center opened in December 2014 as the administration’s response to the arrival of Central American women and children seeking asylum from domestic violence, organized crime and gang violence.

"Many of them are escaping from violence and torture, from abuse at the hands of gangs," Sofia Casini told the Texas Tribune. "To be put inside of centers with armed guards, where the kids are yelled at, it's all a re-traumatization process."

Operated by The Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), the South Texas Family Residential Center is one of two family detention centers in Texas, along with the Karnes County Residential Center, which is operated by the GEO Group and can currently can hold 600 women and children. Karnes is set to expand to a capacity of 1,200. The Dilley  facility detains 480 women and children, and is set to become the largest immigrant detention center in the United States with a capacity of 2,400.

In a statement, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) spokeswoman Nina Pruneda said that facilities like the one in Dilley are "an effective and humane alternative for maintaining family units."

 

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