LCS Corrections

Coastal Bend Detention Center Inmate "Escapes", Unknown for 3 Weeks

The LCS Corrections-operated Coastal Bend Detention Center in Robstown, TX has been in the public eye recently. After initially failing their first jail standards inspection, the facility, equipped with a brand new Warden, passed their second inspection with the commendation of Adan Muñozthe Texas Commission on Jail Standards director. However, the CBDC is not out of the woods yet.

Jamie Powell at the Corpus Christi Caller Times first reported on the problem of an inmate who "escaped" from the facility ("Robstown prison discovers three weeks later that prisoner is missing," The Caller Times, December 11, 2009). The inmate escaped on November 19th, unknown to the facility until December 10th. To make matters worse, the inmate didn't dig a hole and crawl to freedom like in the movies, rather, the facility willingly released him because they confused his identity. The facility failed to return Ms. Powell's telephone calls, as well as my own personal attempts via telephone and email.

The escape of this prisoner is interesting because one of the reasons that CBDC failed their initial inspection was because they failed to perform the required face to face check-ins with each inmate. Additionally, the facility also failed to correctly classify the inmates. These two reasons combined are a recipe for incidents like this where an inmate walked out the door because of poor organization and classification, and why it took so long for the facility to realize what had happened.

Where once Muñoz was impressed with the facility's turnaround after failing the inspection, he now appears disappointed withthe facility:

It doesn’t appear that Estrada Martinez escaped on purpose, said Adan Muñoz, the jail commission’s executive director, after reviewing LCS’s preliminary escape report. He was released.

“What transpired between the wrongly released inmate and the releasing officer is something that LCS will have to investigate,” Muñoz said. “There is no overt action shown by the mistakenly released inmate to indicate he made any statements to the releasing officer that he was attempting to disguise who he was while being released.

“And why the receiving transport service did not verify the inmate’s identity is also something that needs to be ascertained and investigated,” Muñoz said.

LCS contacted the jail commission within 24 hours of the discovery, which is required by law. The company must submit a written report detailing why and how the escape happened, Muñoz said.

The release counts as an escape and could pose problems for the prison, Muñoz said. ("Robstown prison discovers three weeks later that prisoner is missing," The Caller Times, December 11, 2009)

Questions still remain: why would a facility, shortly after passing an inspection with Texas jail standards, let this seriously negligent event happen? Are the guards falling back into their old routines prior to their inspection? What is happening within LCS Corrections to prevent this sort of release/breakout from happening again?

LCS Corrections calls the Coastal Bend Detention Center their "flagship" facility. If CBDC is their flagship, and inmates are walking out without disguising their identity or breaking through a wall, I am surprised the rest of their "fleet" is even able to stay afloat.

Cameron County ships prisoners out-of-county to accomodate feds

In a prime example of how entrepreneurial corrections can skew decisions about jail policy, Cameron County has decided to move 100 of its local inmates over 3 hours away to a private jail outside Corpus Christi.  The reason?  County officials want to ensure they have enough space to house federal detainees - a population that brings in money for the south Texas county.  Here's the story from the Brownsville Herald ("Nearly 100 Cameron County inmates going to Robstown," November 20)

The Cameron County Commissioners’ Court on Friday approved a contract with LCS Correctional Services Inc. that will allow the county to transfer nearly 100 inmates to the company’s privately run detention center in Nueces County. The inmates will be transferred to LCS’ Coastal Bend Detention Center in Robstown, said Gus Reyna Jr., chief deputy for the Cameron County Sheriff’s Department. ...

The inmate transfer is necessary for Cameron County to meet its commitment to the U.S. Marshals Service to provide space for 300 federal inmates in the county’s jail system, County Judge Carlos H. Cascos said.

While it may seem backwards to ship local jail inmates (some of whom are potentially folks not yet convicted of a crime) hours away from family, friends, and their attorneys in order to make room for federal detainees, it's a practice that we're likely to see more of with counties running their jails as profit-making entities much like private prisons.  (In a related story, Cameron County's jails were recently skewered by Texas Jail Project's Diana Claitor in the pages of the Texas Observer ("Heaven and Hell in Cameron County," November 13).)

As we've previously reported, LCS's Coastal Bend lock-up has had difficulty both passing basic inspections and finding prisoners to fill its 1,056 beds.  According to the November Texas Commission on Jail Standards numbers, the facility is currently only 56% full with federal detainees.  We'll keep you posted on the situation at Coastal Bend.

Coastal Bend Detention Center Passes Round Two of Inspection

Last Monday the Coastal Bend Detention Center had its second round of inspection after failing the first on 17 counts of noncompliance. Within thirty days of failing the first inspection and facing the threat of closure, LCS Corrections got their act together ("Private Robstown prison passes state inspection," October 19, 2009):

“They reviewed all the deficiencies and all were corrected 100 percent,” Harbison said. “We are 100 percent approved. The crew, the new warden and his staff are just doing an outstanding job.”

Texas Commission on Jail Standards director Adan Muñoz said the facility will be issued a compliance certificate once paperwork is complete, likely within two days.

Warden Elberto “Bert” Bravo took over as head of the facility about 10 days before state inspectors arrived and a state inspector told him to address problems or face possible closure. Bravo replaced the previous warden who resigned over management issues.
Bravo immediately hired two deputy wardens with more than 60 years of combined experience to help him shape up the facility...

Muñoz said he was surprised that the LCS staff was able to bring the facility into compliance so quickly.

“I could tell they wanted to get back in compliance, but there were quite a bit of things that needed to get done,” Muñoz said. “I have to got commend them for it.”

It is unclear as to whether or not the health hazards of the food preparation were fixed alongside the administrative failures. For more information regarding the Coastal Bend Detention Center's previous citations feel free to review our past coverage.

LCS's Coastal Bend Detention Center Preparing for Round Two of Inspection

Last month we covered the failed inspection of an LCS Corrections facility, the Coastal Bend Detention Center (CBDC). The CBDC failed on 17 different compliance issues, with the director of the Texas Commission on Jail Standards stating the inspection results were "really close to complete incompetence" ("Robstown Prison Fails Inspection," Corpus Christi Caller-Times, September 21, 2009). Also in that article, jail Warden Elberto Bravo was quoted with projecting that he would have his facility in compliance with Texas jail standards by the end of October. 

Recently, Bravo has asked inspectors to return in mid-October for a second round of inspections:

"Texas Commission on Jail Standards director Adan Muñoz said his office has been in regular contact with the Robstown facility and Bravo sent a progress update earlier this week.

“I know the warden has been working hard to correct the issues,” Muñoz said. “I think they can get back on par. Having said that, its my understanding that they now have fired or terminated individuals and they are taking the proper corrective actions.”

The prison, completed in September 2008, received its first inmates in March.

Bravo said when he started the job shortly after Labor Day, he found an array of problems including those cited by state inspectors. Many of the issues already were being addressed when the state inspectors arrived, [LCS Vice President] Harbison said. But for a facility to be in compliance, policies and procedures had to be in place for 30 days, Bravo said. Everything also had to be correctly documented.

“Everything is corrected,” Bravo said.

Bravo will ask inspectors to return the week of Oct. 19, the first week the facility is eligible for re-inspection, he said.

The compliance issues did not decrease the number of inmates. When the facility was inspected there were 475 inmates, mostly undocumented immigrants placed there through a contract with federal agencies. Friday morning there were 478 inmates, Bravo said." ("Private prison now ready to pass inspection, new warden says," Corpus-Christi Caller-Times, October 9, 2009).

While we can take the Warden at his word that all 17 compliance issues have been fixed, there are still some remaining, unmentioned hazards not listed in the Texas Commission on Jail Standards September inspection report. The city of Corpus Christi food service inspection from June of 2009, three months after the brand new facility began to house inmates, reports that the CBDC had failed three aspects of inspection. The inspection report states there were two major violations and one minor violation. The two major violations were that the bulk foods were not stored in their original containers (a handling violation) and the paper products were cross-contaminated by being stored on the floor. The minor violation was the discovery of mouse droppings evident in the dry storage area. The facility was given 90 days to fix these violations, but no evidence has been found as to if they have or have not been rectified. The report gave the facility a total of 11 demerits for their three failures, and anywhere from 11-20 is considered in the "good" category for the Nueces County Public Health District. 

However, LCS Corrections' executive Vice President, Richard Harbison stated, “We want to be in compliance with all agencies... We want to run the best prison we can run and comply with all the rules and regulations, both state and federal” ("Private prison now ready to pass inspection, new warden says," Corpus-Christi Caller-Times, October 9, 2009). This should be the goal of any private prison company contracting with state or federal clients. If they were planning on doing so, one would imagine they would have planned better before failing 17 counts of prison standards and 3 counts of health standards. 

We will stay on the lookout for reports regarding the second round of inspections (both jail and health) to keep you informed on the quality of the CBDC.

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