Corrections Corporation of America

Former CCA employees indicted on bribery charges

The Lone Star News Group reported this week that two former CCA guards have been indicted on bribery charges ("Former prison employees plead guilty to bribery," 5/20/14). 

Carl James Guittard, 36, and Terrie Elaine Glover, 49, were both required to pay a $1000 fine, serve 240 hours of community service, and must serve 10 years of probation. Both were guards at the 2100-bed Mineral Wells Pre-Parole Transfer Facility, which closed on July 30th, 2013 after the Texas Legislature cut its funding. The facility was operated by the Corrections Corporation of America (CCA). 

The indictments also claim that 10 people offered or gave money and prepaid debit cards to Guittard, Glover, or both guards. They also allegedly provided tobacco products to people incarcerated at the facility. A state prosecutor has deemed the investigation "extensive." 

Sixteen formerly incarcerated people were indicted in this investigation. 

Disagreement between CCA and Hidalgo Park owner ends

According to KEYE TV in Austin, there has been a disagreement between the Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) and Manoj Naik, the owner of Hidalgo Park in Taylor, Texas. 

Naik claims that he wishes to hold special events, like weddings and quinceneras, at the park, and would like to host rodeos at the venue as well. 

The Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), who owns the T. Don Hutto Detention Center adjacent to Hidalgo Park, was not pleased with Mr. Naik's intentions. Prison officials declined to speak on camera, but claimed that late-night live music events held at Hidalgo Park could endanger the women detained at the facility.  

Naik claims that CCA is holding his business "hostage" with demands. He also says he has spent $25,000 to comply with CCA's and the city of Taylor's requests.

Jose Orta, president of the local chapter of the League of United Latin American Citizens LULAC , has responded to the feud: 

"I believe Mr. Naik is being bullied by Correctional Corporation of America... They're impeding him by creating barriers." 

Orta brought these concerns to interim city manager Jeff Straub, who asserted that the city's objective was to mediate the situation. 

A Special Use Permit (SUP) was reviewed by the Taylor City Countil on April 24 and was issued to Mr. Naik on May 8 after he negotiatiated with the city of Taylor and CCA. 

 

CCA to host earnings call on May 8

The Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) has sheduled a first-quarter earnings call for May 8, according to Marketwatch ("CCA Announces 2014 First Quarter Earnings and Conference Call Dates," 4/23/14). 

The conference call will take place at 10:00 am central time (11:00 am eastern) on Thursday, May 8, 2014. The call can be accessed through the CCA website. An online replay will be available following the live conference call, beginning at 1:00 pm central time (2:00 pm eastern) and will be available until the same time on May 16. 

To access the telephonic replay, dial dial 888-203-1112 in the U.S. and Canada. International callers must dial +719-457-0820 and enter the passcode 2158209. 

CCA Declared a "Governmental body", must Disclose Records

On March 19, a Travis County, Texas court has declared the the Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) a governmental body, according to Prison Legal News ("Texas Court holds CCA is a governmental body in PLN public records suit 2014"). According to the Texas Public Information Act, CCA, as a governmental body, is required to disclose information to the public. 

This ruling is the result of a lawsuit filed by Prison Legal News (PLN), a monthly publication housed within the Human Rights Defense Center that focuses on criminal justice issues. PLN filed a lawsuit against CCA in May 2013 after the for-profit prison corporation refused to disclose information, such as audits and other investigations regarding the troubled Dawson State Jail, which Grassroots Leadership helped close that same year. The records in question would have been public had Dawson not been operated by a private company. CCA operated nine facilities in Texas, four of which are used to incarcerate state prisoners. 

PLN managing director Alex Friedmann commented on CCA's secrecy: 

This is one of the many failings of private prisons... By contracting with private companies, corrections officials interfere with the public’s right to know what is happening in prisons and jails, even though the contracts are funded with taxpayer money. This lack of transparency contributes to abuses and misconduct by for-profit companies like CCA, which prefer secrecy over public accountability.

PLN argued that CCA can be defined as a "governmental body" because the company performs duties that are also performed by the government. CCA rebutted, claiming that not all funds from Texas are allocated for Texas facilities, but are instead used to "to support CCA’s corporate allocations throughout the United States." PLN's has won a lawsuit against CCA in Tennessee and another is pending in Vermont. 

Brian McGiverin of the Texas Civil Rights Project, who represented PLN along with Cindy Saiter Connolly, calls the ruling against CCA a "victory":

The conditions of Texas prisons have been the focus of intense public scrutiny for nearly 40 years... Today’s ruling is a victory for transparency and responsible government. Texans have a right to know what their government is doing, even when a private company is hired to do it.

 

 

 

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