“What happens if you privatize prisons is that you have a large industry with a vested interest in building ever-more prisons.” -- Molly Ivins, 2003

Private prison working on permits to demolish existing parts as they look to reopen notorious facility

Willacy County Regional Detention Facility
A private prison company is working on getting permits to continue their push to reopen the Willacy County Detention Center, reports KRGV 5.

On Monday, Management and Training Corporation (MTC) went with Raymondville officials to inspect the facility as they work to reopen the Willacy County Detention Center. Following the inspection, MTC officials said they plan to demolish ten prison tents that were damaged in a 2015 prisoner uprising. Eleazar Garcia, Raymondville's city manager, said MTC required permits to tear down the structures. Garcia said it would take about a day to process the permits.

Raymondville officials hope that the reopening of the facility will lead to a rebuilding of their economy. The facility could bring between 150 and 200 jobs to Raymondville.

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Private prisons spend big money lobbying in Texas

According to a recent report by Texans for Public Justice, private prison companies are willing to spend big money lobbying for new laws that benefit the prison business.

Texas has always been a prime spot for companies wishing to operate private prisons in the U.S. The two largest private prison companies, CoreCivic and the GEO Group, operate more than 40 facilities in Texas. New data from advocates show how much effort and money those companies put into lobbying Texas officials in hopes of opening new facilities throughout Texas — or protecting their interests in current family detention facilities.

According to the report, private prison companies in 2017 paid 10 lobbyists up to $480,000 dollars to lobby Texas state lawmakers. The GEO Group spent the most, paying up to $320,000 on lobbying. This is evident this legislative session, as one Texas lawmaker admitted that a GEO lobbyist wrote a bill that would give the state of Texas power to license family detention facilities as child care facilities, increasing the amount of time women and children could be detained in these prison camps.

Family detention centers struggle to get licensed

The GEO Group, a private prison company who operates a family detention center in Texas, is struggling to get their center licensed, reports the Associated Press.

Willacy County prison to be inspected next week

The owners of the Willacy County Detention Center are taking a step forward in reopening the facility after more than two years with an upcoming inspection, reports KRGV 5.

The Willacy County Detention Center is known by critics as "Ritmo" — short for Raymondville's Guantánamo prison. It is owned by Management and Training Corporation (MTC), a Utah-based private prison company. Though it has been closed for more than two years, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) had expressed interest in reopening the facility following presidential orders increasing border security and immigration enforcement. Officials from MTC and the city of Raymondville, where the facility is located, will inspect the facility Monday at 10 a.m.

Raymondville Mayor Gilbert Gonzales said MTC officials were eager to reopen the facility. “They’re going to start working on the facility itself right now to start repairing the damage, and also to make sure they’re up to specs. We’ll have our code enforcement officer here,” he said.

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