“What happens if you privatize prisons is that you have a large industry with a vested interest in building ever-more prisons.” -- Molly Ivins, 2003

Eden mayor and city officials begin planning for detention center closure

The mayor of Eden and city officials are in the planning phase as they prepare for the closing for the Eden Detention Center, reports the Concho Valley News.

The Eden Detention Center is operated by CoreCivic (formerly known as Corrections Corporation of America), one of the largest for-profit prison corporations in the United States. The contract to operate the facility will expire on April 30. CoreCivic has already notified its employees with a 60-day layoff notice. The facility employs people from San Angelo, Brady, Menard, and Ballinger, amongst others.

As well as employing people from the surrounding towns, the detention center is responsible for around 40 percent of the revenue generated each month by the city's water fund. That is equal to $40,000 a month, and city officials say losing that revenue would financially cripple Eden. San Angelo city council members recently passed a resolution in support of keeping the detention center open, with officials in Brady wanting to do the same.

Lives lost in ICE custody

At least six people have died while in the custody of Immigration and Customs Enforcement since October 2016, reports Fusion.

During Fiscal Year 2017, which started on October 1, 2016 and lasts until the end of September 2017, Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) reported the deaths of six individuals in their custody. Two of those individuals were held in Texas detention centers until their untimely deaths.

Olubunmi Toyin Joshua, from the United Kingdom, had been detained in the Rolling Plains Detention Center in Haskell, Texas. She had been detained in the detention center for more than eight months before her death. ICE did not disclose a cause of death. The Rolling Plains Detention Center is operated by the for-profit, private prison company Emerald Company.

Wenceslau Esmerio Campos was a Brazilian national who had been detained at the South Texas Detention Complex outside of San Antonio. Wenceslau was taken to the Frio County hospital after complaining of chest pains to prison officials. He was then taken to Methodist Hospital of San Antonio, where he died. His preliminary cause of death was listed as cardiac arrest. The South Texas Detention Center is operated by the GEO Group, one of the largest for-profit prison companies in the U.S.

According to Fusion, there were 12 in-custody deaths reported during Fiscal Year 2016; in Fiscal Year 2015, seven people died in ICE custody.

GEO Group buys two facilities in Texas

The GEO Group has bought two more correctional centers in Texas, reports the News-Review

Officials in Maverick and Jones counties confirmed that their closed detention centers have been bought by the for-profit company GEO Group, which runs the most immigrant detention centers in Texas. GEO did at one time operate the facility in Maverick County, but in 2013 there was a disagreement over the contract and how profits were divided up between the company and the county. This led to GEO Group pulling out of the contract, with the county attempting to operate the facility and repay the bonds. They were unsuccessful and the county eventually had to foreclose on the facility. 

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Walker County applies to house immigrant detainers for feds

Walker County submitted an application to U.S. immigration officials to house undocumented immigrants charged with criminal offenses, reports the Huntsville Item.

Walker County Sheriff Clint McRae and Captain Steve Fisher met with both Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials to discuss the possibility of detaining undocumented immigrants in the Walker County Jail. For now the county could only lease 20 beds to the federal government, because any more would cause staffing and other issues at the jail. However, the sheriff said that the county could take more immigrants detainees if a deal was struck with DHS and ICE.

If a contract is approved, the jail would have to meet federal standards to house detainees. Capt. Fisher believes that will not be an issue since the jail is only a few years old. Sheriff McRae said that if the contract is awarded, he will consider sending four deputies to Washington D.C. to be trained by ICE as part of the 287(g) program.

When the jail was being built, Walker County officials told taxpayers that they would look for ways to bring in additional revenue. Capt. Fisher said that is what they are doing.

 

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