“What happens if you privatize prisons is that you have a large industry with a vested interest in building ever-more prisons.” -- Molly Ivins, 2003

Lindsey State Jail official invites teens looking for summer work to consider CCA


Google Maps shows the Country Club next door to the Lindsey State JailGoogle Maps shows the Country Club next door to the Lindsey State JailThere are several job openings at the Lindsey State Jail in North Texas as a result of a "rough year." And Security Chief Jim Cochran thinks local teenagers should apply. 

Jacksboro Newspapers reports: 

Cochran said it has been a rough year for the facility, with three correctional officers being lost for various reasons. Correctional officers are needed at the facility right now, which Cochran said would be a perfect job for those teenagers needing a job. The facility is also in need of a horticulture instructor and substitute teachers.

“Most teenagers won’t be making $10 an hour and that’s what we start at,” Cochran said. “We also offer health benefits for under $100 a month to our employees, which are pretty good.”

The Lindsey State Jail is run by the for-profit, private prison company Corrections Corporation of America. Anyone looking to work for CCA would do well to read up on the company's history. A report released by Grassroots Leadership in 2013 details CCA's track record of "Keeping Costs Low and Profits High Through Employee Mistreatment."

The report explains that CCA's cost-cutting initatives include low pay, little benefits, forcing employees to work without pay, and underpaying female staff. Perhaps the nearby Jackboro Country Club is hiring caddies. 

Congressional delegation to visit Texas family detention centers

Congressional Democrats announce their tour of two Texas family detention centersCongressional Democrats announce their tour of two Texas family detention centersOn Monday June 22 and Tuesday June 23, eight Democratic House members will visit two Texas family detention centers, the GEO-operated Karnes County Residential Center outside of San Antonio, and CCA-operated South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley. The House members announced their trip and expressed concern over the Obama Administration's family detention policy in a press conference held last Thursday.

"It is not illegal to apply for asylum. It is the law of the land," said Rep. Gutierrez.

"Detaining children puts them at risk of mental and developmental problems," said Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer. "The people in these detention centers are...the tired, the poor, the huddled masses yearning to breathe free of which Emma Lazarus spoke and which is emblazoned on our Statue of Liberty."

 

The members who will be touring the detention centers are: Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer (MD-05), Rep. Joaquin Castro (TX-20), Rep. Judy Chu (CA-27), Rep. Raúl Grijalva (AZ-03), Rep. Luis V. Gutiérrez (IL-04), Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (TX-18), Rep. Zoe Lofgren (CA-19), and Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (CA-40). They are among the 136 House Democrats who signed a letter to DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson calling for an end to family detention. 

 

Negotiations extended in Flores settlement, which could impact family detention policy

Negotiations based on this 1997 settlement are still underway.Negotiations based on this 1997 settlement are still underway.

Negotiations between immigrant rights and government attorneys have been extended for another week in what been known as "the Flores case" after parties were unable to reach an agreement based on Judge Dolly Gee's preliminary decision.

As previously reported, some advocates believe that this litigation could cause dramatic changes to, or even end, the government's current policy of detaining asylum-seeking mothers and children while their cases proceed through immigration courts.

The outcome of these negotiations could determine the future of three family detention facilities, which together have the capacity to detain more than 3,000 individuals. These include two for-profit facilities in Texas: the Karnes County Residential Center run by the GEO Group, and the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley run by Corrections Corporation of America.

The new deadline set for reporting on the Flores Settlement negotiations is July 3.

Willacy County still reeling after prison uprising as insurance doesn't go far enough for local community

Willacy County Correctional CenterWillacy County is still feeling the effects of an immigrant prisoner uprising that destroyed the privately operated Willacy County Correctional Center in February. The prison, run by Management & Training Corporation (MTC), was closed due to significant structural damage causing the relocation of 2,500 federal prisoners and nearly 400 employee layoffs.

Willacy County Correctional Center

According to recent reports, the county received about $4 milion in insurance money, but county officials say the money won't last long. Currently, the money is being divided four ways — clean up from the uprising, county administration costs, losses to MTC, and payments toward the $9 million bond to pay for the jail. 

In the meantime, hundreds in the community are struggling financially. One employee who was laid off in March said her unemployment compensation is insufficient and she is taking out a loan to help cover her bills. 

The county aims to get the facility up and running again, but the insurance money may not last. And, if the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) decides against renewing the contract, the county could face a big blow to their income. 

 

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