“What happens if you privatize prisons is that you have a large industry with a vested interest in building ever-more prisons.” -- Molly Ivins, 2003

Advocates protest UT alumnus Red McCombs' involvement in Dilley family detention center

UT Alumna Deborah Alemu; Image from the Daily Texan

Red McCombs, a well known alumnus of the University of Texas, is half of the partnership that makes up Koontz McCombs — the real estate group contracting the land with the Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) for the new family detention camp in Dilley, TX.

The ominously named South Texas Family Detention Center will be able to hold 2,400 people, making it the largest immigrant detention center in the country and putting it on par with the internment camps built for Japanese families during World War II.

On Monday, November 17th, students, alumni, and other advocates gathered at UT's McCombs School of Business (named after McCombs in recognition of his financial support of the school) to petition Thomas Gilligan, dean of the school, to urge McCombs to reconsider the deal with CCA. 

According to some sources, Dean Gilligan agrees that the practice of detaining families is unjust. It's up to McCombs to determine the next move.

The GEO Group has already seen a return on their investment in family detention

The GEO Group's stock prices hit a new 52-week high this week, reaching $38.69 a share. At a stockholder meeting in August, the company promised increased revenue — a projection of $26 million this year — resulting from the return of family detention to the Karnes County Civil Detention Center in Texas that same month. 

Karnes County Detention CenterKarnes County Detention Center

The Corrections Corporation of America is also profitting from the return of family detention, with the construction on the newest and largest immigrant detention center in the country—the South Texas Family Residential Center—beginning last month in Dilley, TX. CCA reportedly will make $298 dollars per person per day in Dilley. 

Private prison corporations are counting on the expansion of immigrant family detention as an entirely new income stream. They can charge the government more than $250 per day for every individual (mother or child) housed in their facility, over $100 more than they can charge for an adult in immigrant detention. 

 

Karnes County Family Detention Center becomes the newest site in a long string of human rights abuses against immigrant detainees

The Karnes City Family Detention Center came under intense scrutiny earlier this month when the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund (MALDEF) and lawyers from the University of Texas School of Law submitted a complaint that guards have been committing “substantial, ongoing sexual abuse” against the mothers being detained.

When the facility—run by the GEO Group—began receiving mothers and their children at the beginning of August, advocates remembered the conditions and trauma that the families detained at the T. Don Hutto facility had to endure from 2006 to 2009On an ICE directed visit to the Karnes facility last month, mothers complained about the severe cold, poor food quality, and the lack of freedom that they and their children experience on a daily basis, a nearly identical description of initial conditions in the Hutto facility.

Private prison corporations like the GEO Group deal primarily in adult criminal detention, and are not equipped to deal compassionately with vulnerable populations such as recently arrived immigrant families who are seeking asylum. “The recent allegations of sexual abuse don’t surprise me at all,” Grassroots Leadership’s Immigration Projects Director Cristina Parker commented, "I'm sickened, but not surprised." A report jointly released by Grassroots Leadership and Justice Strategies documents the lousy track record of the GEO Group when it comes to human rights abuses.

Welcome new TPB blogger Eshe Cole

Texas Prison Bid'ness is pleased to welcome Eshe Cole to our blogger line-up. Eshe is the new Mental Health and Criminal Justice Program Coordinator at Grassroots Leadership, one of the sponsors of Texas Prison Bid'ness.

TPB Blogger Eshe ColeTPB Blogger Eshe ColeMost recently, Eshe worked as a Program Coordinator for the City of Austin helping to develop a pilot program addressing maternal health disparities for African-American women in Austin/Travis County. She also spent the past few years working with Mamas of Color Rising, a local group of women who organize around various social justice issues pertaining to poor and working class mothers of color.

Originally from Temple, Texas, Eshe attended the University of Texas at Austin where she studied Sociology, African-American Studies and most recently received her PhD in Cultural Anthropology.

“I am very excited about the opportunity to work with such a great group of people fighting against the injustices of the Prison Industrial Complex. I am looking forward to contributing to the critical work at Grassroots and helping to create change that matters.”

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