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CEC faces wrongful death suit from Dallas family

A Dallas family filed suit this month against New Jersey private prison operator, Community Education Centers, Inc. (CEC), after the death of Charles Alvarez. The family alleges that Alvarez was given improper medical care while in custody at the Parker County Jail in Weatherford, Texas. The federal lawsuit names CEC and seven jail staffers as plaintiffs.

Police believe that Alvarez had been assaulted shortly before a Weatherford police officer found him lying in the roadway on North Denton Street on February 7, 2015. However, the officer arrested him on public intoxication charges and took him to the Parker County Jail.

At the jail, Alvarez told officials for 20 minutes that he could not breathe before an ambulance was called. He became unresponsive seconds after an ambulance was requested and CPR performed by jail personnel failed to revive him. Alvarez, 25, was ambulanced to Plaza Medical Center in Fort Worth where he died from internal bleeding, multi-organ failure, and heart failure.

The Parker County jury declined to indict anyone in for Alvarez’ death but obtained arrest warrants for two suspects for misdemeanor charges in connection with his assault.

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Immigrant families sue to stop licensing of Karnes and Dilley family detention centers

On Tuesday May 3, immigrant families and Austin-based nonprofit Grassroots Leadership filed a lawsuit to stop the state of Texas from licensing the Karnes and Dilley family detention centers. The suit comes after the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services granted a six month license to the Karnes County Residential Center on Friday April 29 despite deficiencies in the facility’s inspection. A spokesperson for the agency also announced that the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley is expected to receive a license within the week.

In the suit, Grassroots Leadership and detained families argue that DFPS may not alter the standards of child care licensure to accommodate federal detention facilities without approval of the Texas legislature. Immigrant rights groups have argued that the state’s motivation for licensing the facilities is to defend harsh federal immigration enforcement rather than to protect children.

“Changing an interpretation of Texas law to help federal immigration officials enforce harsh detention policies is disingenuous and detrimental to the health of children in Texas,” executive director Bob Libal of Grassroots Leadership told the Texas Observer.

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Former guard at Jack Harwell pleads guilty to improper sexual relationship with inmate

A former guard at the Jack Harwell Detention Center, Melissa Corona, has pled guilty to charges of sexual misconduct with one of the inmates. Ms. Corona was indicted in March 2014, after allegations that she began a relationship with a male inmate in 2013 by kissing him more than 10 times.

Ms. Corona was the fifth person to be arrested in 2013 after an investigation into improprieties between staff and inmates. Three other female guards were arrested on charges of sexual misconduct, and a male guard was charged with bringing contraband into the facility.

Top Texas Private Prison Stories of 2014 - #4 - Bizarre hazing exposed at the Bartlett State Jail

A bizarre hazing ritual at the Bartlett State Jail in central Texas that led to the sexual assult of one inmate and was the subject of a lawsuit against the Corrections Corportation of America is our #4 top story of the year. 

As we reported in September:

Bartlett State Jail is a prison facility for low-level inmates serving short-term sentences. The tradition of hazing inmates who are near to their release date involves forcibly removing their pants, turning them upside down and slamming them against the glass of the guard station. It is impossible for guards to ignore the behavior, as they are literally faced with the exposed backside of the inmate who is being hazed. Bartlett’s Warden Eduardo Carmona and other CCA executives were previously aware of the tradition and yet had never attempted to prevent it from happening.

According to the court documents, the hazing incident that resulted in the sexual assault was a three hour ordeal in which every single inmate in a 55-person block was subjected to the hazing practice while the single officer on duty — who was not only in charge of the victim’s block but three other 55-person blocks — did nothing to intervene.

Typically, in correctional facilities that follow best practices, there should be two officers on duty at all times so that one can intervene while the other calls for backup. 

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