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January 2016

UT Law professor sues over records related to CCA detention center

Hutto protester
Hutto protester
A University of Texas Law Professor has sued the federal government to get records related to bonds at an immigration detention center operated by Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), according to a story by Jazmin Ulloa in the Austin American-Statesman last week.  Immigration Law Professor Denise Gilman has sued Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to gain access to records related to bonds at the T. Don Hutto detention center in Taylor, Texas.  

The Hutto detention center has gained notoriety over the years, first when it was a controversial immigrant family detention center between 2006 and 2009 and more recently as the nation's only all-women's detention center, detaining mostly asylum-seeking women.  The facility was the site of hunger strikes last fall by women demanding to be released after prolonged detention.

According to the article:

"Gilman says she detected a pattern of federal officials setting 'across-the-board bonds,' regardless of whether detainees posed a threat of fleeing or a danger to the community, in order to extend their stay at the facility and thus meet a congressional mandate to maintain 34,000 immigration detention beds daily across the country. She wants all records related to the procedures and process that officials used to make their decisions on each woman’s individual case, according to the lawsuit filed in the Western District of Texas.

She first asked for the documents March 31, 2014, but by the time the agency had 'closed' her request a year and a half later, it had produced only an Excel spreadsheet with two columns of redacted information, the complaint states."

Private prison corporations have been under increased scrutiny for their role in upholding the nation's immigration detention bed quota, including with a report from Grassroots Leadership, my organization, last year that found that private prison corporations put a large percentage of their lobbying resources into the committee that maintains the quota.  We'll keep you posted on developments from the litigation.  

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