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CNBC Special on "Billions Behind Bars: Inside America's Prisons" explores Prison Privatization

Last night, CNBC aired "Billions Behind Bars: Inside America's Prisons,".  The special focused on the profit motive involved in various aspects of the corrections industry including prison privatization. 

Specifically, the CNBC show explored the relationship between the private sector and government and raised issues on whether private prison contracts are good public policy.

CNBC's website features two articles from Dave Shapiro with the ACLU's National Prison Project and Leonard Gilroy with the Reason Foundation write opposing views on prison privatization. 

Shapiro's piece, For-Profit Prisons: A Barrier to Serious Criminal Justice Reform.  In the article Shapiro charts the growth of the private prison population nationally,

As incarceration rates skyrocket, the private prison industry expands at exponential rates. The number of inmates in private prisons increased by roughly 1600 percent between 1990 and 2009. In 2010, the two largest private prison companies alone took in nearly $3 billion in revenue, and their top executives each received annual compensation packages worth well over $3 million.

Gilroy's article, Embrace Competition to Lower Costs, Improve Performance in Prisons, continues to support the use of private prisons and cites Texas as an example:

research by the Texas Legislative Budget Board found that, since 2003, the average cost of housing inmates in private prisons has been 3 percent to 15 percent lower than in comparable state-run prisons.

Yet we know that other researchers have concluded that the savings achieved from private prisons are not as significant as Gilroy claims.  A 2001 study by the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) found that “rather than the projected 20-percent savings, the average saving from privatization was only 1 percent” and “the promises of 20-
percent savings in operational costs have simply not materialized.” The study found that these modest savings “will not revolutionize modern correctional practices.”

The CNBC special is a good overview of different issues related to the money that drives the nation's corrections industry.  It airs again on October 21st at 8pm EDT and program highlights can be found here at the station's website. 

 

Comments

INCARCERATING PEOPLE "FOR PROFIT" IS IN A WORD....WRONG!
In fact, until all private prisons in America have been abolished and outlawed, “the promise” of fairness and justice at every level of this country’s judicial system will remain unattainable. We must restore the principles and the vacant promise of our judicial system. There is urgent need for the good people of this country to emerge from the shadows of indifference, apathy, cynicism, fear, and those other dark places that we migrate to when we are overwhelmed by frustration and the loss of hope.
My hope is that you will support the National Public Service Council to Abolish Private Prisons (NPSCTAPP) with a show of solidarity by signing "The Single Voice Petition"
http://www.petitiononline.com/gufree2/petition.html

Please visit our website for further information: http://www.npsctapp.blogspot.com

–Ahma Daeus
"Practicing Humanity Without  A License"…

I agree profiting from incarcerating prisoners could create more problems than are trying to be solved.  My dad has been an wrongful death attorney for over 30 years, so I've heard a lot of stories about the overcrowding problems in prison.  I definitely think privatizing prisons would be the wrong answer.  When people are profiting from people being locked up, I could see that this could create a biased result.  Not good.