“What happens if you privatize prisons is that you have a large industry with a vested interest in building ever-more prisons.” -- Molly Ivins, 2003

Immigration agency expands family detention facilities

The San Antonio Express reported that Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) recently extended the contract at the South Texas Family Residential Camp in Dilley, Texas until 2021.

The detention center in Dilley, which is run by Corrections Corporations of America (CCA), is used to detain Central American mothers and children who are seeking asylum.

This comes as the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees ICE, is reviewing whether they should follow the Department of Justice's decision to phase out the use of private prison corporations. "I don’t know what they’re thinking, to be honest with you,” Michelle Brané, director of the Migrant Rights and Justice Program for the Women’s Refugee Commission, said of ICE’s renewal of the Dilley contract.

The new contract, though for the facility in Texas, is actually passed through an existing contract with the city of Eloy, Arizona.  The U.S. government will pay about $13 million a month for the facility in Dilley, which is about half of the previous payment.

ICE has also said that they are reviewing proposals for an additional 2,500 family detention beds at various sites. GEO Group, the private prison company that runs the Karnes County family detention center, said that they will propose taking a portion of the new beds that ICE are seeking.

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Private prison stocks surge after Trump election

The stocks of two private detention companies have soared following the election of Donald Trump, reported Bloomberg Markets.

Stocks in CoreCivic (formerly Corrections Corporation of America) rose by as much as 60 percent before leveling off at a 34 percent increase. GEO Group saw an increase of 18 percent in their stock at the time same time. These two companies are seen to benefit from Trump's presidency, as he has vowed to increase the number of deportations, which will lead to the need for more immigrant detention centers. These are often run by private companies such as CoreCivic and GEO Group.

The announcement and following increase of stocks helped turn around some of the losses both companies had experienced following the announcement from the Department of Justice (DOJ)  that they would begin to phase out the use of private prisons. The president-elect is most likely to reverse the policy of the DOJ to no longer use private prisons.

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2 former Willacy County prison guards charged with bribery

Willacy County Regional Detention Facility

Two former prison guards from the Willacy County Regional Detention Facility were arrested Friday, as reported by Valley Central.

Stephan Salinas and Harry Cordero were both employed at the Willacy County Detention Facility, which is run by the private prison company Management & Training Corp. (MTC) in Raymondville, Texas. This facility was destroyed in a prisoner uprising in 2015 due to poor medical conditions and neglect. Before that, the facility lost its Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) contract in 2011 due to physical and sexual assault by the guards on prisoners.

Cordero and Salinas were both fired by MTC in January following internal investigations of the two guards. Cordero was charged with two counts of bribery and one count of providing contraband in prison. He was found to have accepted bribes to allow alcohol and a cell phone into the prison in December of 2015.

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New identity doesn't address core of Corrections Corporations challenges

Private prison company Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) has decided to rebrand itself in hope of moving away from the perception of for-profit prison company, as reported by The Street. The company would now like to be called CoreCivic.

Stock in CCA has been under pressure ever since the Department of Justice decided to phase out the use of private prisons in August. The company is hoping that the new name and diversifying their interests into real estate and treatment facilities will help the company move away from it’s negative image as a private prison company and help the company bounce back from decades of bad press.

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